Will Life Always Be A Series of Likes? 

Driving in my car the other day, I heard a statistic on the radio that surprised me, or more so, startled me. The statistic read that ‘social media is currently more utilized and active within adults ages 35-49, as opposed to the assumed adult group of ages 20-34.’ After graduating college and entering the adult world, I thought I was exiting the realm of constant and endless refreshing, irrelevant posts, and giving a like for a like. But maybe, it seems, I’m just entering.

As much as we don’t want to admit it, we spend an unhealthy amount of time on various social media accounts such as Facebook and Instagram. It could be classified as a hobby for some of us if you want get technical because by definition, a hobby is an activity done regularly in one’s leisure time for pleasure. You know what they say, if the shoe fits. And as much as I personally try to devote less time to scrolling through Instagram and looking at the same set of pictures I just saw 5 seconds ago, or watching my friend’s snap chat stories (usually not even paying attention to what I’m watching but just clicking it so it clears from my stories list), I fall victim into black hole of social media.

Perhaps hobby wasn’t even the right word for describing what kind of activity social media is for some people, but maybe it’s a habit. I can’t even count the amount of times I’ve thought to myself “Okay, time to get up and get stuff done, stop looking at your phone” and then without even thinking, I’m right back to scrolling through Twitter or watching a Tasty video on Facebook that I’ll never attempt to try.

I’m not saying there’s anything wrong with social media- I’m an avid Tweeter, Gramer, Chatter, and Booker, but after this statistic it’s alarming to think that maybe we won’t grow out of this phase and life doesn’t get more exciting as we get older.

My friend, Dee, sent me a screen shot of a tweet she came across that read, “Sooo do I just randomly decide to be an adult one day and delete Twitter or am I gonna be 40 tweeting about my annoying daughter or what”. This woman’s thoughts on the correlation between age and social media hinders why I’m questioning the same topic.

In recent years, Facebook has become more than just a social media site and evolved into more of a foundation on how to keep updated on people’s lives, but more precisely, meaningful things happening in people’s lives like marriages, babies, graduations, and even deaths, unfortunately. This social media site in particular is also probably more often utilized by adults 40 and over, who may not have the time to catch up with everyone of their friends and family on a daily basis, and it provides a good way to stay informed about happenings within the lives of those people you’ve grown apart from, but still care about. So, Facebook, you get a free pass.

On the contrary, Snap Chat is most definitely primarily a younger market, and serves absolutely no purpose. I definitely indulge in using my snap chat story way too often, but when will I stop? At what age does it become too immature and redundant? How many meals can we post on our stories until we realize that no one actually cares, or when will we stop posting ten second long videos of us and our friends that, other than the people involved, no one else has any idea what’s happening. Or when will we realize that we all have cameras on our phones that can take pictures that last longer than 24 hours? (And probably provide better quality, especially if you have an Android).

Instagram is probably my favorite social media site to use right now, because I like looking at really cool pictures of different people’s vacations or artsy photos or just pictures when people look to be their best selves. And of course the memes! But something that I do notice that I ‘m tired of seeing is girls posting selfies with an irrelevant caption,  “throwbacks” from 2 months ago, and degrading or uneducated posts, usually regarding politics, because I think that’s meant for Twitter.

Twitter is useful for different things like promotions, businesses, politics, news, and much more. I think it’s something I’ll probably always use, but when do we stop tweeting things about our own life? When’s that cut off between using it to obtain information about things other than our friends, and use it as a mature adult trying to stay informed about things happening around the world?

Like I said, I don’t think social media is a bad thing, I just think it takes up too much of our time, and how our time could be used towards so much more. I also don’t know when it changes for us. When will it not be all about how many likes you get on a post? When will it not be all about how many favorites or re-tweets it gets? When will we start liking pictures because we actually like them, and not just because we feel obligated? When will we unfriend or unfollow people we added while drunk at a party one night and play absolutely any relevance in our lives?

Social media is definitely important, I especially know that from having my degree in Marketing, but when will our lives stop revolving around it?

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The Struggles of Moving Back Home After 4 Years of Semi-Independence

Let me just start off by saying that I’m very aware that moving home after graduation today is the most responsible, and maybe even the only option because of the skyrocketing pile of loans we all have; but in return, we better prepare ourselves to leave our freedom at mom and dad’s doormat and return to a lifestyle we outgrew. This may feel like a step in the wrong direction, but hopefully it’s just a pit stop while we keep piecing together our adulthood puzzle. However, even after knowing why moving home is the most sensible decision, it doesn’t make this hard pill any easier to swallow. If you’re reading this, mom and dad, I love you and please don’t kick me out. Also, I’m sure you’re equally as unhappy about this change as I am, maybe even more.

So here it is. My parents aren’t the most health conscious people when it comes to eating, which is fine, but after eating like shit the past four years, I’m trying to be better about what goes into my diet. So usually I buy a good amount of my own groceries with the exception of the staples like milk or eggs.

On Monday night, after already having a huge blow out with my mom about not remembering to text her that I wouldn’t be coming home the night prior, I went to the food store and bought groceries for myself to last the week. Normal, right? And not for nothing, my parents should be happy I’m buying my own groceries and not expecting them to just provide me with whatever I want and pay for additional items when they go food shopping. Well, in case you didn’t already guess, that’s not the case! The second I walked in the door with, mind you, two bags, the first comment I get thrown at me is, “You better not have bought anything that needs to be refrigerated because there is absolutely NO room for anything else.” Like holy shit, people, it’s not the end of the world if we have to rearrange a few things. I feel like I’m living with my psychotic roommates from junior year all over again who made me feel like an inmate in my own house, minus the bitchiness. This anecdote could be misconstrued as over dramatic, but I’m not exaggerating when I say my parents make comments like this all the time…

Not to keep talking about the kitchen, but it’s also frustrating that I want to make different dinners than what my parents make but it’s hard because 1) the kitchen is small, 2) my mom thinks it’s rude when I don’t want to have what she’s having, 3) I’m somehow always in their way even if I cook 2 hours after they do and 4) even if I do wait those 2 hours and cook myself a meal, the second I finish the last bite I can already hear my mom saying for the six hundredth time to clean up the kitchen. So, it’s not even enjoyable and I rarely do it.

Anyway, I realized I really took living at school for granted and didn’t realize how truly beautiful it was while it was happening. All those times I came home for a weekend, or even just a day- regrets!

Don’t get me wrong, I love my home and family. I mean it could definitely be way worse; but man, do I miss coming home after a long day and being able to just plop on my couch, catch up on social media, and relax without being interrogated as if I just committed a murder. “Why are you home so late?”, “Where were you?”, “Who were you with?”. Get the point? Sometimes I sit in my car for a few minutes outside of my house just to avoid 20 questions. And if it’s not the questions then it’s the repetitive, mundane comments like “Take your stuff up when you go up.” “Put your shoes on the steps.” “Hang your coat up” etc.

What I miss even more than coming home and not having to answer to anyone , is the people I was coming home to. Of course it’s nice being given the option to move home after college and not being forced to live on my own right away, but I miss having roommates my own age- people that have more common interests, like to gossip, and watch the same TV series. Not to mention, sometimes just wanting to drink a bottle of wine in the middle of the week for no reason. Although, I think I could easily persuade my mom into that one… she’s a good time.

Don’t even get me started on why living at home post grad is an obstacle and continuing struggle in the dating world, whether you’re in a relationship or not. You know what I’m getting at!

When it comes down to it, I really shouldn’t complain about living at home right now considering its dirt cheap, aka free, and I don’t have a whole lot of money especially after factoring in student loans; not to mention my constant, unsuccessful internet sourcing job search. But now I realize that paying rent pays for a lot more than just the literal roof over your head, electric, and gas- you’re paying for freedom and independence, a different and exciting lifestyle and an area more suitable for your job and/or social life.

So while everyone else on my Facebook feed is getting engaged, married and/or having babies, my only goal right now is to move out at my bank accounts earliest convenience. But until then, hopefully my parents don’t kick me out after reading this, and I can start saving up to make the move and truly experience my 20s!