Why Every Job Should Be Considered A “Real Job”

Traditionally, to simple-minded, ignorant people, a “real job” would qualify as something doted as successful like a doctor or lawyer; something that took a great deal of effort to achieve. Even worse, today most people associate the term with anything that pays you a salary or provides some type of health benefits and/or a retirement plan. Or any type of job that requires a degree and has you sit on your ass 40 hours every week.

But let’s not forget that that true meaning of the word ‘job’ simply means anything in which one receives payment for performing some type of service.

So, when did it happen that some roles in the working sphere became classified as a real job and others simply viewed as, “not a real job”?

This term is offensive, untrue and utterly mind boggling that people differentiate jobs into these two categories.

The term also brings along people who assume things about others working in certain industries, such as they probably don’t have a degree or they have no motivation. Again, untrue and offensive.

As someone who works in both the service industry and the cushy 9-5 lifestyle, I can say that both industries are very much real jobs and should be viewed as equal, and the former even more so than the latter.

Most alternatives to a regular office job require physical demands like being on your feet all day or carrying things for hours on end. While those inside an office sit most of the time, although they too can become mentally exhausted, it’s not as physically demanding as the job of a bartender, plumber or nanny, for example.

When you’re working in the service industry, customer service, taking care of children, working a blue collar job, or anything outside of the 9-5 sentence, odds are, you’re busting your ass everyday and for probably over 40 hours a week.

You may not have the same schedule or lifestyle as those who may be office workers, nurses, teachers or whatever profession deems them as having a “real job”, but you’re definitely working equally as hard, if not more.

Where you work, what you’re doing, the pay check and any added bonuses, do not define your worth. If you consider it work or feel like you’re doing something you’re passionate about, or even if you’re just content about, it’s a job, and it’s your job. Most importantly, it’s a real job.

If you come home from work feeling tired, it’s a real job. If you come home form work with money in your pocket or a pay check, it’s a real job. If you come home feeling like you did something for someone else, it’s a real job. If you come home from work feeling physically or mentally exhausted, it’s a real job.

Whether someone is a nanny, a bartender, server, tailor, hair dresser, or gas station attendant, they’re making an honest living and they’re doing it on their own terms in respect for their own happiness. There should be no kind of negative or misconstrued connotation associated with their job titles in our society.

Our time is valuable, and how we choose to spend it everyday, and how we choose to earn a living, is a personal decision that is not up for judgement or criticism.

I don’t know when people, especially those recently emerging to the working world, became so snobby about titles and paychecks, but it’s certainly bothersome and pretentious.

And just to shed some light on the fact that those with these pretentious opinions are those who are miserable at their “real jobs” who do mindless, repetitive tasks without any purpose, don’t have any real conversations with their co-workers and complain about how boring their jobs are, all because they fell into the pressure that society put on them to “get a ‘real job'”.

Anyway, maybe the next time someone is serving you drinks, cutting your hair, filling your gas tank, painting your house, watching your children, or all of the other things that you never give a second thought to, remember that you wouldn’t have any of these things fulfilled if it weren’t for those who don’t have “real jobs”.

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101 Questions You Need to Ask in Your Twenties: What Am I Doing Now?

Long time supporter of Paul Angone’s writing and voice to those feeling lost in their twenties, I’m no less pleased with his latest release, 101 Questions You Need to Ask in Your Twenties!

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Sometimes we need to hear the harsh truth of reality when facing life’s continuous obstacles, sometimes we need to hear others share their real-life stories to be able to relate, and sometimes, we need to reflect on our own life to be able to better ourselves and increase our happiness and well-being, which is exactly what Paul’s new book provides.

If you’ve never read any of Paul’s previous publishing’s, I highly encourage you to do so, but if you have, you’ll know that his style of writing is relate able, humorous and helpful in times when we can’t always see the light at the end of the tunnel.

101 Questions is an integrated guidebook for those in their twenties, an uphill battle that feels almost impossible to win at times. But as an advocate for the millennial generation, Paul poses questions that we’re all thinking in our heads, and some that we’ve never thought to ask but should.

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Whether you’re an avid reader or a read a book once a year kind of person, this book suits you. Even more, it seems to be targeted for those in their twenties, but Angone also makes a note that this book can be beneficial for those of you in your thirties and beyond as well. The lay out and design of this book make it super easy to read fairly quickly but also provides the opportunity to just read specific chapters if you wish, as you don’t necessarily need to read every chapter to be able to get to the end. ( You should read every chapter though because they’re all super insightful!) This set up is similar to his first book that was published, 101 Secrets for Your Twenties, which is when I first found hope for my post-grad life through Paul’s voice and writing.

In the opening introduction, there’s a statement that resonates so well with me, it’s uncanny; and for those of you who have followed me along on this blog, I’m sure you can feel the same. Paul writes in relation to the plunge after college graduation, “I felt confused, afraid, and alone-those visions of making a difference while making a lot of money quickly changing into just making it through another day. In these dark halls, I’d occasionally bump into other twenty-somethings, clearly as confused as me and muttering, I don’t belong here.

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Paul’s vision of what he imagined life after college to look like is probably similar to what all emerging graduates expect. But the harsh reality is that 9 times out of 10, it’s not and it’s up to us to work hard, persevere and have faith that things will work out.

I think that Paul’s approach in this book to stimulate us to reflect and questions ourselves as a way to achieve a fulfilled life and overcome obstacles is genius. Although his other books provided great insight and advice on adulthood, this one focuses more on who we are on a more personal level and what we can do to change.

The questions are categorized into four sections throughout the book which include:

  • Adulting to win: Thriving in the big picture and small details of adulthood.
  • Careerish: How to build a career that is meaningful (while making you money).
  • Relationshipping: Dating, marriage, networking, friendship, mentoring, oh my!
  • Signature Sauce: Uncovering where your passion, purpose, and calling collide.

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With all of that being said, some of my favorite questions from his new release that really got me thinking have been dispersed through picture within this review.

I encourage you all to read this book, use this book, and recommend this book because the community of confused millennial’s, lost post-grads, and worried adults is larger than we can even begin to know. But being a part of, or having a sense of community along this bumpy journey is something that everyone could use whether they realize it or not.

Below, I have provided various links to which you can purchase this book. Please share any and all content relating to the book whether it be this review, someone else’s review, posting pictures of your book, or even writing your own review!

** If you order from Moody Publishers use the coupon code: Questions40 to receive 40%off PLUS free shipping on orders of $25 or more.**

I hope you enjoy it as much as I did, I can’t wait for another book of thoughts from Paul Angone!

Moody Publishers

Target

Barnes and Noble

 

The 9-5 Sentence: The Truth Behind A Full-time Job

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Less than two months into my full-time job and I feel suffocated. Maybe suffocated isn’t the right word to use, but I feel trapped. There are only seven short days in a week and the average working person is expected to work for 8 or 9 hours during five of them. Which, in perspective may seem fair in regards to the paycheck, but when you think about how much can be done over the course of eight hours, or how much you can accomplish, you may begin to question why the standard work week has you grinding 9-5 Monday through Friday.

Regardless of the hours employees are expected to actually be at work, we can also factor in commute time to our respective workplaces. So now not only are we looking at 8-9 hours a day, we might be designating 9-11 hours to our work day. Maybe this a stretch, but it’s still something to think about considering the time you spend working per day is more time than you designate to yourself a day.

Furthermore, just thinking about how extensive eight hours actually is, we can begin to wonder what else we could be accomplishing during this time frame; laundry, cleaning, errands, working out, binge watching- an episode on Netflix is only 43 minutes…

An alternative way that the corporate world could employ could be by giving each employee a set of tasks that need to be completed in a given week, giving them 40 hours to complete the task and being able to finish before the 40 hours is up; rather than judging a full work week on how many hours an employee sits on their ass in front of a computer screen. Because let’s be honest, we all have times throughout the week we find ourselves just staring at the clock, waiting for that eighth hour to roll around enabling us to clock out.

And before you begin to think I’m naïve, just know I fully understand that this is just how the working world is, and I accept it. It’s just interesting to analyze the mundane, routineness that surrounds it. In a way, I appreciate it too since it pays the bills, but would I rather be working from my home? Yes, and I’m super jealous of those who have the opportunity to do just that. Which brings me to my next point, why can’t most people in the corporate setting work from home?

For those who sit behind two screens all day, you can probably agree that most of your work could be conducted from the comfort of your home since all you really need is the internet and a computer, and maybe a phone. I condone businesses that allow their employees the flexibility of this work style, and encourage others to do the same. But what really raises questions for me, is when businesses allow employees who are sick to work from home, or require their employees to work from home on snow days- this is a dead giveaway that working from home is possible and can be done.

To top this all off, after working ex amount of hours a day, by the time you get home there isn’t much energy left to get anything done. Then before you know it, you’re hitting the hay to recharge your batteries and start the same routine tomorrow. I now understand why everyone lives for Fridays; they are extremely crucial to the happiness and well being of us young, 20 something year olds.

I know that I’m doomed to the 9-5 sentence for life, but that’s just how the world works. And I knew that by choosing to go to school for something in the corporate field, I had already fallen victim to this life, but I’ll accept if for as long as the paychecks keep coming. Hopefully one day I can escape this mandated schedule and find a job where I make my own schedule, be the one who makes the schedule or even better, can work from the comfort of my own home, on my own time.