Why Every Job Should Be Considered A “Real Job”

Traditionally, to simple-minded, ignorant people, a “real job” would qualify as something doted as successful like a doctor or lawyer; something that took a great deal of effort to achieve. Even worse, today most people associate the term with anything that pays you a salary or provides some type of health benefits and/or a retirement plan. Or any type of job that requires a degree and has you sit on your ass 40 hours every week.

But let’s not forget that that true meaning of the word ‘job’ simply means anything in which one receives payment for performing some type of service.

So, when did it happen that some roles in the working sphere became classified as a real job and others simply viewed as, “not a real job”?

This term is offensive, untrue and utterly mind boggling that people differentiate jobs into these two categories.

The term also brings along people who assume things about others working in certain industries, such as they probably don’t have a degree or they have no motivation. Again, untrue and offensive.

As someone who works in both the service industry and the cushy 9-5 lifestyle, I can say that both industries are very much real jobs and should be viewed as equal, and the former even more so than the latter.

Most alternatives to a regular office job require physical demands like being on your feet all day or carrying things for hours on end. While those inside an office sit most of the time, although they too can become mentally exhausted, it’s not as physically demanding as the job of a bartender, plumber or nanny, for example.

When you’re working in the service industry, customer service, taking care of children, working a blue collar job, or anything outside of the 9-5 sentence, odds are, you’re busting your ass everyday and for probably over 40 hours a week.

You may not have the same schedule or lifestyle as those who may be office workers, nurses, teachers or whatever profession deems them as having a “real job”, but you’re definitely working equally as hard, if not more.

Where you work, what you’re doing, the pay check and any added bonuses, do not define your worth. If you consider it work or feel like you’re doing something you’re passionate about, or even if you’re just content about, it’s a job, and it’s your job. Most importantly, it’s a real job.

If you come home from work feeling tired, it’s a real job. If you come home form work with money in your pocket or a pay check, it’s a real job. If you come home feeling like you did something for someone else, it’s a real job. If you come home from work feeling physically or mentally exhausted, it’s a real job.

Whether someone is a nanny, a bartender, server, tailor, hair dresser, or gas station attendant, they’re making an honest living and they’re doing it on their own terms in respect for their own happiness. There should be no kind of negative or misconstrued connotation associated with their job titles in our society.

Our time is valuable, and how we choose to spend it everyday, and how we choose to earn a living, is a personal decision that is not up for judgement or criticism.

I don’t know when people, especially those recently emerging to the working world, became so snobby about titles and paychecks, but it’s certainly bothersome and pretentious.

And just to shed some light on the fact that those with these pretentious opinions are those who are miserable at their “real jobs” who do mindless, repetitive tasks without any purpose, don’t have any real conversations with their co-workers and complain about how boring their jobs are, all because they fell into the pressure that society put on them to “get a ‘real job'”.

Anyway, maybe the next time someone is serving you drinks, cutting your hair, filling your gas tank, painting your house, watching your children, or all of the other things that you never give a second thought to, remember that you wouldn’t have any of these things fulfilled if it weren’t for those who don’t have “real jobs”.

Advertisements

Alternatives to the 9-5 Sentence After Graduating

The idea of going to college for four years to emerge with the promise of a full-time job is a fading dream, vision and goal of today’s millennial’s.

Instead, as a community of confused post-grads, most are seeking alternatives that could last them two to three years before jumping into the black hole of 40 hour work weeks, regimented lifestyle, and most importantly, responsibility.

It’s true that (on paper) we have the rest of our lives to work, so why should we rush it? Of course there are other reasons to seek full-time employment other than just a pay check. It’s the more responsible choice for incentives such as a 401K, health benefits, paid-time off, resume building, establishing relationships, networking, etc. And for some people, this is exactly what they work toward during their time in college. For others, they want more time to do other things besides work, things that are fulfilling, memorable and meaningful. Although the people around them may not agree, like their parents, it’s important that everyone have the option to take a path other than the 9-5 sentence immediately following college graduation.

Traveling is a big alternative. In a way, the 12 years leading up to college graduation has prepared millennial’s for this. We spend a large portion of our education learning about all there is to see and do in this crazy world, it’s only right to seize the opportunity to actually experience some of it instead of just reading about it. In addition, if you’re like me and living at your parents, it’s also a good time to travel financially as you may not be paying rent yet.

Some may also incorporate more schooling into their travels by working towards a master’s degree or doctorate internationally, which is both productive and adventurous. Traveling can also bring perspective into your life and open up different opportunities that may not have existed otherwise.

Taking an internship instead a job right away is a common choice that I’ve been hearing about more and more from recent graduates. Sometimes it can also be necessary if you’re determined to enter a certain field. Whether it be paid or unpaid, sometimes you have to take this route, especially when your job search becomes discouraging.

Volunteering can be a common venture for some. Whether it be a week, month, or a year, there are so many different programs, both domestic and international, working with different organizations that are always looking for more hands. This is a good opportunity to gain some perspective as well as defer your loans while you figure out what it is you really wish to peruse. Also can’t hurt to add it to a resume…

Working a part-time job while working on job applications is something everyone should consider. If all you do is fix up cover letters, send out resumes and compulsively check your inbox in the hopes of getting an interview, you will drive yourself mad. Fill some of your time with a mindless job with people your own age, while also making some cash. The job search can be longer than expected, I can tell you that first hand, and I’m sure many would agree.

Going back to school is popular, whether it be to advance your degree in what you studied in undergrad, or, completely changing career paths and going back to study an entirely different subject. But, this leads to more debt (for most people) which is something I’m personally trying to avoid.

Or, if you went and got your given degree and never want to succumb to the 9-5 lifestyle, as many choose not to, that’s more than okay too. I think the most important choice you can make is just to choose what makes you happy even when others don’t always approve or agree with your decision.

There are also so many alternatives for people to ponder, these are just a handful of choices. If you have any other ideas, please comment below!

Cheers!

 

 

 

 

A Like For A Like

We used to judge someone’s popularity based on how many Myspace friends they had, then that graduated to Facebook friends, and then to Instagram followers and likes. I can’t lie and say I’ve never fallen victim to silently linking unpopularity to a low number of Instagram followers, especially in college, but can now confidently say that your social media “friends” have nothing to do with your friends.

Now, it’s almost annoying to have to have an excessive amount of connections on social media because I constantly find myself wondering who some of the people are in my feed, and more importantly, why am I liking their posts? There are multiple times a day I find myself having to click and creep on someone’s Facebook page to figure out who the page actually belongs to, which basically admits I spend entirely way too much time on social media, but I know I’m not the only one guilty of this. Why am I liking pictures of your dog, your brother-in-law’s friends baby, your dinner or your new hair style? It has become second nature to like multiple Instagram posts in a row, most of the time without even really taking notice to what’s in the square frame. And the fact that the stigma associated with likes and popularity has increased so much in the last four years just makes me realize how much wasted time on social media has also increased. For example, when Instagram started becoming popular a few years ago, a lot of likes was considered 30 or more, now, people pray not to be cursed with receiving less than 100. But a good enough caption can go a long way.

The number 100 doesn’t seem large in the grand scheme of the things, but seriously who actually has 100 friends? If we were only connected on social media sites with just the people we’re friends with, I would have about 25 followers. I have almost 800 Instagram followers and over 1,000 Facebook friends, so you can see my issue with the ratio here; averaging at 150 likes, only about 17% of them I talk to on a regular basis.  Maybe my definition of a friend differs, but my standard includes anyone I would be comfortable hanging out with one on one. However, we live in a society obsessed with social media and constant communication, so we follow people we met once eight years ago and continue to be dedicated likers. Again, guilty.

It’s pretty sad that in college you may have been considered a bitch if you didn’t like someone’s post that continually liked yours. Either that, or the person thinks they wronged you in some way. Or, someone didn’t think you’re attractive. God, what an asshole. But putting it into perspective, half the time I don’t even like a picture, I just tap twice because I feel indirectly, morally obligated. It’s like an unwritten rule among millennials. But when do we draw the line? Will we forever be following and supporting  people’s life decisions, events, news, and announcements through a virtual thumbs up or heart? Will this continue on until we’re eventually liking pictures of their grandchildren’s first day of school? I honestly have no idea because the social media market is constantly growing and changing, I’m almost hoping Myspace makes a comeback one day.

I’m not saying it’s ridiculous or wrong in any way to ‘like’ our acquaintance’s posts, I’m just examining the reality behind it. Maybe one day I’ll dissect my list of friends on Facebook to those I’m close with, or sift through Instagram and delete people I met in high school who I haven’t seen or heard from since graduation, but until now I’ll continue to religiously like the pictures and posts in my news feed.